Winter has arrived and along with the freezing temperatures comes the onslaught of cold and flu bugs. It might seem like the only way to defend your family against the germs is by putting them in a bubble, but there are some things you can do without resorting to hibernating until spring.

Here’s our guide to keep your kids healthy during the winter.

Photo: Troy T via Unsplash

Flu season is in full swing.

The most dreaded season has officially arrived: the season of stuffy noses and fevers is here. After last year’s deadly flu season, we’ve got the complete rundown on everything you need to know about the flu season this year.

Speaking of the flu, make sure your kid gets their flu shot.

When given the choice between a shot and anything else, kids will almost always choose “anything else,” but when it comes to the flu vaccine, trading in the needle for the nose spray might not be the best idea. A new study recently confirmed which flu vaccine works best for kids. (Hint: they’ll need a band-aid afterward.)

Sometimes, it’s not “just” a cold.

January through March marks peak season for respiratory syncytial virus—known more commonly as RSV.While this virus may seem like the common cold, it isn’t.  Read on to find out what is RSV and what parents need to know.

P.S., it’s also hand, foot and mouth disease season.

Is your kiddo in daycare? Do your littles spend plenty of time around other children? Hand, foot and mouth disease in kids is a common childhood illness—it’s common for kids to pick it up this time of year. Even though anyone of any age can come down with a case of HFMD, this easy-to-pass-on virus is most often seen in children ages five and under.

photo: schlauschnacker via Pixabay

Have a cold? Science says try chicken soup.

It turns out mom was right: chicken soup really is the best dish for a sick day. One dietician explains how chicken soup can help fight a cold.

These are the Vitamin C recipes you need to fight a cold.

When it comes to vitamin C, orange juice is old news. We’ve hunted far and wide and rounded up a bevy of recipes that will upgrade your family’s daily dose of this all-important vitamin. From healthy Dole Whip to irresistible Brussels sprouts, these foods are high in vitamin C and worthy of any winter menu.

Let the kids nosh on some chocolate if they have a bad cough.

Getting kids to take their medicine isn’t always easy, unless it happens to be a spoonful of chocolate. Your kids will think you’re Mary Poppins when you bust out the chocolate as a cough remedy and, according to experts, it can do more good for their throat than codeine.

Still desperate to cure a cold? Put potatoes in your socks. (Yes, really!)

When kiddo is sick you’ll do anything to make them feel better. One mom swears by this potato trick during cold and flu season. But does it actually work?

 

Photo: sweetlouise via Pixabay

Pump the breaks on the probiotics.

A stomach bug is never fun for kids or parents. In fact you’ll probably do just about anything to avoid the misery -and mess- that comes with one. Unfortunately you might have to count one item out of your parental bag of tricks as new research shows that probiotics don’t help stomach bugs.

Prep these mom-tested home remedies for cold and flu season.

Cold season is upon us, which means it’s time to stock up on home remedies to help soothe your kids if they catch a cold but may not require a trip to the doctor. These simple ways to treat a cold at home will bring your little ones some comfort for symptoms ranging from a cough or a sore throat to nausea, a stuffy nose and more.

Keep your kids warm and safe for winter weather play.

As temperatures drop, it’s still important for children to get outside and play. It’s a bit more complex as parents and caregivers need to ensure the children are properly protected from the cold. To adequately prepare, it’s vital to know the actual temperature and the wind chill factor, to know how many layers and what type of clothing will protect children in cold weather.

Follow these pediatrician-approved tips to keep winter germs at bay.

If you’re a parent and you want to protect your family from the cold and flu, going to a doctor’s office is the last place you want to go. Even though it might sound counter-intuitive, you run the risk of exposing your kids and those with compromised immune systems to more germs and making mild cold symptoms go from from bad to worse. Don’t fret—there is a solution to the threat of the waiting room.

—Shahrzad Warkentin

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