There’s been no shortage of buzz or curiosity about the Kellogg’s NYC cereal-themed cafe. “A restaurant dedicated to classic cereals? Really?” “Who would pay for a bowl of cereal?” commenters asked in online forums. All culinary judgements aside, the Kellogg’s NYC cereal cafe is extremely kid-friendly and offers a fun, cute, and tasty menu that will please cereal-lovers both young and old.

kellogg counter

photo: Neal W. via Yelp

Cereal with Serious Foodie Cred
The cafe is located in the heart of Times Square, next to M&M World, so it’s a convenient spot to visit prior to seeing a kid-friendly Broadway show. It is tiny inside, with about eight tables for sit-down eating and a long counter where patrons can stand and dig in to bowls. (Surprise: almost everything on the menu ties into Kellogg’s cereal in some capacity.)

Anthony Rudolf and Sandra Di Capua of Journee (a community for restaurant professionals) and vets of Thomas Keller Restaurant Group and Eleven Madison Park respectively, as well as award-winning chef Christina Tosi were brought on board to develop some of the café’s inspired and delicious items.

kellogg locker

photo: Adrian R. via Yelp

Your Number’s Up!
Part of the fun of the Kellogg’s café is the process, of course — if you just wanted cereal you’d stay home. When you enter Kellogg‘s NYC, you pick up a menu from the counter and place your order. You’re then handed a little gadget that not only blinks when food is ready, it tells you the number of the locker — found among a long wall of red lockers — where you can pick up your order. (It’s very middle school, in the best way possible.) Meals are protected by a plastic cover in case you want to take food to go.

kelloggs cereal

photo: Ahu S. via Yelp

It’s Not a Cereal Experience Without a Toy
Inside your paper “lunch bag” is also a surprise toy housed in a plastic egg —  because we all know nothing was more exciting as a kid than finding a tiny treat inside the cereal box. (Ours contained a temporary tattoo and two bounce balls.)

The cafe’s seating area is small but compact and cozy, and free of any overwhelming or obnoxious “theme” restaurant decor, which is welcome in Times Square. (The most you get is some vintage cereal boxes and toys behind the counter.) The fruit is fresh and food hits the spot when you want something light and fun to eat when walking through the busiest area of Manhattan.

Kelloggs4

What’s Good?
Cereal bowls come in sizes regular ($7.50) and small ($6.50) and include a carton of Five Farms Milk in Whole, Skim, Soy (+$1), (Plain) Yogurt (+$2), or Blue Marble Soft Service Ice Cream (+$2). Bowl mixes include Pistachio & Lemon: a blend of Special K Original, Frosted Flakes, Thyme, Pistachios and Lemon Zest and The Corny Blues (Corn Pops, Pinch of Salt, Blueberry Jam, Lemon Zest) and more.

If your child is a picky eater you may want to choose the “Raid The Pantry” option ($4.50 regular; $3.50 small). Customers can select a bowl of classic Kellogg’s cereal, including Rice Krispies, Corn Flakes, Raisin Bran, and Special K, as well as Froot Loops, Cracklin’ Oat Bran, Frosted Mini Wheats, and other standbys; a side of a carton of milk is included. Adds-ons such as peaches, strawberries, banana, pecans, almond butter and boosts such as white chocolate chips and chai tea powder are also available for $1.50 an item.

ADVERTISEMENT

You can also get hot and cold beverages here, from iced tea and orange juice to coffee and tea, as well as desserts such as sundaes. Sweet and cool creations, made with Blue Marble self-serve ice cream, include Honey Buzz (Honey Smacks, Honey, Pecans, Banana Chips) and You’re Cracklin’ Me Up (Cracklin’ Oat Bran, Dried Cranberries, White Chocolate, Toasted Coconut).

Two important notes for parents: the café doesn’t have high chairs or bathrooms. (But an employee was happy to point us in the direction of a nearby restroom in the area.)

Kellogg’s NYC
Hours: 7:00 a.m. – 11:00 p.m.
1600 Broadway (Between 48th and 49th Streets)
Times Square
Online: kelloggsnyc.com

Fun or ridiculous? Tell us what you think in the comments!

—Rachel Sokol