If berry picking is on your summer bucket list, blueberries are one of the easiest berries for kids to pick—no thorns and the ripe ones just roll off the bushes. And with more than 40 blueberry farms across our state, and dozens within a short drive of Seattle, it’s easy to fill your bucket (and your belly) with this sweet summer fruit. From Arlington to Enumclaw, we’ve hand-selected 12 organic and natural U-pick blueberry farms for your family to try.

Editor’s note: Remember to always call ahead before you go picking since farm hours and schedules are constantly in flux.

berry picking

photo: Nicole Dankworth

Organic Farms

Blue Dog Farm
Perfect for: Dawn ’til dusk access to bulk amounts of berries.
Located in quaint farming town of Carnation, the folks at Blue Dog are serious about their organic blueberries; they even have a membership-driven concept to better support their sustainable and organic farming practices. This is a great option for folks who want frequent access to lots of berries all season long. As a member ($30 annual fee or $25 before July 1) you get to come any day you want, dawn ’til dusk, and pick to your heart’s content at the self-service farm. (You’ll still pay by the pound, but you get to pick anytime you like and in the quiet and calm of a tranquil farm almost all to yourself!). Sign up to become a member at the farm on your first day of picking or by email (berries@bluedogfarm.com). A few days might also be open to the general public (check the website for details), but that was not the case in 2014 or 2015. Psst! Visitors are encouraged to bring a blanket and pack a picnic for lunch on the farm.

Broers Farms Berries

photo: Broers Farm

Cost: $2.80/lb (members also pay $30 annual fee). Checks or Paypal only.
Hours: Members can pick daily, dawn ’til dusk. Public days/hours will be posted on their website if available.
Dates: Early July – end of season

7125 W. Snoqualmie Valley Rd.
Carnation, Wa 98014
Online: bluedogfarm.com

Blue Dot Farm
Perfect for: A well-manicured park-like picking experience.
Not to be confused with the previous and similarly-named blueberry farm, Blue Dot Farm is newer to the Puget Sound blueberry scene (they are based south of Seattle in Enumclaw) and also managed organically. This pastoral farm is only in its fourth year as a U-pick farm, but is off to an exciting start with 16 varieties of blueberries to pick from, including some of the largest varietals and a few still under patent. Also unique to Blue Dot is that you buy your U-pick berries by the bucket size (large or small), not the pound. Pre-picked berries are also available, but call ahead to make sure your order is ready for you when you arrive.

blue dot farm

photo: Blue Dot Farm

Cost: U-pick: $30 large bucket (11-12 lbs); $15 small bucket (5-6 lbs). Pre-Picked: $3.50/pint or $20/flat (6 pints). Cash only.
Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Call ahead prior to coming as picking dates/times depend on berry ripeness.
Dates: June 18 – mid-Sept.

21010 S.E. 416th St.
Enumclaw, Wa 98022
360-825-1623
Online: bluedotfarm.com

Bow Hill Blueberries
Perfect for: Locavores looking for a day trip.
Hailed as the oldest family-run blueberry farm in the Skagit Valley, Bow Hill Blueberries (located between Mt. Vernon and Bellingham) are certified naturally grown. Bow Hill is officially a “transitional organic farm,” meaning they abide by all the strictest organic farming practices and completed their transition to certified organic in 2014. Their great website offers excellent ideas for a day trip, including nearby shops they love (we want to check out the chachkies at the Lucky Dumpster and sample some cheese at Samish Bay Cheese) and cafes to try (with a name like the Breadfarm, it’s gotta be good). The kids will love WilGun Corn, a kid’s vegetable farm stand nearby. And if you’ve left the kids behind, why not check out the Golden Distillery for a little sampling of their local whiskey and brandy.

Blueberry Picking Gal

Cost: $2.95/lb (cash, check, Visa & Mastercard accepted); we-pick berries vary in price according to quantity. Five pound half flats range from $10-$40; frozen berries are a little more.
Hours: Fri.-Sun. from 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Dates: July 3 – mid-Sept.

Good to Know: A $5 Grazing Pass gives you access to the fields where you can eat as much as you want. The pass price is refunded once you pick over 10 pounds – which takes about 30-45 minutes. The passes help support the you-pick operation and staffing. The farm offers family passes for $15 for up to five family members. Sign up for their mailing list to receive harvest information, updates on events and special offers.

15628 Bow Hill Rd.
Bow, Wa 98232
360-399-1006
Online: bowhillblueberries.com

Broers Farms Inc 
Perfect for: Families who want to mix and match their berries.
Nestled into the fertile countryside in Monroe, Broers Farms is a berry-lovers dream come true; that goes double if you like your berries 100% organic. (They’ve been certified organic for 25 years!). At Broers, the whole family is welcome to pick in their fields of raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, marionberries and of course, blueberries. FYI – Raspberries fields are about a mile from the farm, so groups are organized and escorted out. Be sure to wear long sleeves and pants if you’re venturing away from blueberry patches; the rest can have a few brambles. If Broers is busy or out of the berry you’re looking for, check out Bolles Organic Berry Farm right next door (17930 Tualco Loop Rd.).

Broers Farms Inc

photo: Broers Farms

Cost: $3/lb for U-pick blueberries; $2.50/lb for U-pick raspberries and marionberries
Hours: 10 a.m.-5 p.m., but change daily. Check their Facebook page for available picking dates/times (updated daily)
Dates: June 18 – mid-Sept.

18228 Tualco Rd.
Monroe, Wa 98272
425-248-9321
Online: facebook.com/pages/Broers-Farms-Inc

Whitehorse Meadows Farm
Perfect For: A scenic day trip to the mountains (oh… and great blueberries).
Snuggled at the base of Whitehorse Mountain about 20 miles east of Arlington (about 1.5 hours from Seattle), this lovely scenic blueberry farm has three organic blueberry varietals ( Spartans, Rubels and Jerseys) for you to pick from. (Psst… They’ve also received the Salmon Safe certification for their stewardship practices). Bonus: You can get their frozen berries and unique preserves (blueberry mango chutney, anyone?) at the farm, or visit them at the Ballard, Magnolia and Lake Forest Park farmers markets.

blueberry picking kalyn

photo: Kalyn Gustafson

Good to Know: The farm has picking buckets, but you will need to bring containers for carrying your fruit home.

Cost: $3/lb U-pick; $4/lb pre-picked
Hours: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Check their Facebook page for available picking dates, times and weather updates. Always closed on Sundays and Mondays.
Dates: Mid-July – mid-Sept.

38302 SR 530 N.E.
Arlington, Wa 98223
360-436-1951
Online: whitehorsemeadowsfarm.com or on Facebook

Smith Creek Blueberry Farm
Perfect for: Kids who like farm animals.
Nestled in a beautiful pocket of Smith Creek, just north of Raymond, Smith Creek Blueberry Farm is a small, owner-operated, all organically grown, family farm. The farm has a solid acre of 30 year-old u-pick and we-pick blueberry bushes with some of our state’s biggest blueberries. In addition to blueberries bushes, expect to find lots of farm animals roaming around including over 60 happy chickens along with ducks, rabbits, tortises, dogs, cats, milking goats and a burro. July through September, the farm store is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., selling fresh seasonal daily picked fruits and vegetables; all-natural farm eggs are sold year-round.

Good to Know: Farm tours are available by reservation and request. Call or email smithcreekfarm@gmail.com.

Cost: $2/lb U-pick; $4/lb pre-picked (2015 prices)
Hours: Saturdays and Sundays, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.
Dates: Early July – mid-August

625 Smith Creek Rd.
Raymond, Wa 98577
360-942-2923
Online: on Facebook.

Natural & Sustainable Farms

Bryant Blueberry Farm
Perfect for: Kids!
With goats, chickens, a playground, picnic area, giant jumping pillow, barrel train ride and two great summer festivals (Red Rooster Route and the Bryant Blueberry Festival), Bryant Blueberry Farm gets the family-friendly award for sure. Their juicy blueberries are grown with sustainable agricultural methods, as are their currents, tayberries, raspberries and beautiful U-pick flowers. And, if your kiddos get totally pooped out with all the pony rides and duck-chasing, you can always cheat and buy a few flats of pre-picked natural berries to take home. You may even get talked into bringing a blueberry plant home, so you can u-pick at home next year!

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Cost: $2.50/lb for U-pick; We-pick berries available at market price in flats (12 pints), half-flats (6 pints) or pints. $3/pound for U-pick tayberries.
Hours: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays from 8 a.m.–4 p.m. Farm is open even when fields are closed, so call ahead if you want to pick.
Dates: June 22 – late August

Good to Know: Pre-orders are welcome. Frozen berries are available year round, subject to availability. In addition to berries, the farm also sells local vegetables.

5628 Grandview Rd.
Arlington, Wa 98223
360-474-8424
Online: bryantblueberries.com and on Facebook

Canter-Berry Farms
Perfect for: Families in search of a heritage experience.
South of Seattle-ites will love this Auburn-based blueberry farm that has been famously selling their blueberries at Pike Place Market since the early ’80s. (They also raise prize-winning horses, hence the name). Although not organic, Canter-Berry proudly limits their chemical use and does not spray their berries. Some of their bushes are over 50 years old, and you’ll be able to pick from eight different varieties of gorgeous jewel-toned fruit (including one that is even a little bit spicy!). Check their handy u-pick page after 6:30 p.m. daily to confirm their next picking day.

mountain view blueberry

photo: Mountain View Blueberry Farm

Cost: Check online (2015 prices were $2/lb; no pre-picked berries)
Hours: Daily, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.
Dates: Early to mid-July – Aug. (check their Facebook page for updates)

Good to Know: The farm provides buckets for you to pick into, but they ask that you bring boxes or other containers to take your berries home in.

19102 S.E. Green Valley Rd.
Auburn, Wa 98092
800-548-8418
Online: canterberryfarms.com or on Facebook

Henna Blueberry Farm
Perfect for: Multi-taskers who want to see it all!
Located in Fall City in the Snoqulamie River Valley (about 30 minutes north of Seattle), Henna Blueberry Farm grows ten varieties of the fruit including Reka, Duke and Bluecrop for you to pick from. Although not certified organic, Henna Blueberry farm doesn’t spray any synthetic pesticides or chemicals on their blueberry bushes. And, if you want some farm variety for your U-pick adventure as well, along the five-mile corridor of SR 203 that connects Fall City and Carnation, you’ll find Henna Blueberry Farm, and many other family-friendly farms, produce stands and U-pick spots, including the kid-tastic Remlinger Farms, and great CSA at Oxbow Farm.

Cost: $2.50/lb U-pick; $3.75/lb pre-picked (cash or check only)
Hours: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.; Saturdays, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sundays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Call ahead to make sure berries are available. Farm is closed on Mondays and Fridays; view current schedule online.
Dates: June 11 – mid-Aug.

1800 Fall City Carnation Rd.
Fall City, Wa 98024
425-806-2751 (weekdays) or 206-605-4601 (weekends)
Online: hennablueberryfarm.com or on Facebook

Larsen Lake Blueberry Farm
Perfect for: Pickers short on time.
This super conveniently located farm has been operated by the Bellevue Parks and Community Service Department since the 1940s. Sitting on land with a historic log cabin and trails in the Lake Hills Greenbelt, the spraying of chemicals and pesticides is minimized on the farm’s blueberry plants. Grab your buckets (provided) at Lake Hills Farm Fresh Produce stand, and after you’re done picking, you can grab a week’s worth of fresh produce there as well.

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Cost: $1.50/lb (cash or checks only)
Hours: Tuesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; closed Mondays. Hours vary; call ahead to confirm.
Dates: July – mid-September

14812 S.E. 8th St.
Bellevue, Wa 98007
425-260-2266 or 425-499-5322
Online: ci.bellevue.wa.us/blueberry_farm

Mercer Slough Blueberry Farm
Perfect for: First timers wanting easy picking, just around the corner.
Sitting off a main thoroughfare in Bellevue, the Mercer Slough Blueberry Farm is a u-pick located near Lake Hills Farm Fresh Produce Stand. In addition to blueberries grown using natural practices, a variety of locally grown farm fresh produce from the Lake Hills Greenbelt and other local farms is for sale. This location couldn’t be easier for a first-timers introduction to u-pick blueberries.

Cost: $1.50/lb (cash or checks only)
Hours: Tuesday – Sunday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; closed Mondays
Dates: Mid-June – mid-September

2380 Bellevue Way S.E.
Bellevue, Wa 98004
425-467-0501
Online: ci.bellevue.wa.us/blueberry_farm.htm

Good to Know: The Lake Hills Farm Fresh Produce Stand is open Tuesday-Sunday, mid-June – Sept. from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Please bring valid Washington state identification as a deposit for picking buckets, and remember to check in with the produce stand upon arrival.

Bybee Farms
Perfect for: Families who want stunning scenery with their picking experience.
Located approximately two miles from North Bend, at the base of Mt. Si, is where you will find Bybee Farms. This family farm, currently owned by Steve and Jayne Bybee, has been in their family since 1946 and it’s where you will find 42 acres of farmland and six varieties of U-pick blueberries including Stanley, Dixi, Pemberton, Jersey, Blue Ray, and Blue Corp, plus some raspberries and fresh picked vegetables from mid-July to mid-September. The farm is not certified organic, but they do not use pesticides or herbicides and only spray for a fungus in the winter before the branches on their blueberry bushes start to even leaf and bud out. The farm also practices safe and sustainable farming methods and have for over 70 years! So you can rest assured that when you come out to the fields the berries in your bucket will have no sprays whatsoever on them. Pretty cool, huh?! Psst… be on the lookout for the elusive mountain goats (who like to make appearances) while you pick the biggest, freshest blueberries east of Seattle.

Keep in Mind: The farm’s smaller, darker berries hold the highest amount of anti-oxidants.

Good to Know: Call the recording (425-888-0821) for specific information about the crops; when they will be ready, price, weather closures, etc. You can email or call 425-888-5745 before you come to the farm to check on weather and picking conditions. Also, no dogs are allowed in blueberry fields, so leave Fido at home.

Cost: $2.10/pound (cash only; bring $1 bills)
Hours: Daily, 9 a.m.-8 p.m. during blueberry season with hours possibly changing the further we go into the fall.
Dates: Approximately mid-July to mid-September

42930 S.E. 92nd St.
North Bend, Wa 98045
425-888-5745 (main phone)
425-888-0821 (recording)
Email: sbybee4@comcast.net
Online: bybeenimsfarms.com

Tips Before You Go: 

1. What to bring: Bring berry buckets and some giant ziplock baggies to bring home your loot! Hats, sunglasses, sunscreen, sturdy shoes and lots of water are also good to pack along. Most fields are in full sun, and sometimes you have to walk a while to get to the perfect bushes. Be ready to be out in the sun for at least an hour.

2. Remember Sal and her mother. In the classic kids book, Blueberries For Sal, mom lets little Sal wander and she ends up having a bear cub encounter. Although you’re certainly safe from bears in all these fields, do keep a close eye on wandering tots. It’s easy for little people to get disoriented in blueberry bushes that are taller than they are!

3. Leave the pups at home. Most farms don’t allow dogs, and it’ll probably be too hot to keep them in the car.

4. Remember to always call ahead before you go picking since farm hours and schedules are constantly in flux.

Where does your family like to go for U-pick blueberries? Do you have any tips for making the trek with little ones easy? Tell us in the Comments below!

— Katie Gruver & Kristina Moy