Here’s a hobby your kids will fall for hook, line and sinker! Whether from a sandy beach, a wooden pier or a small boat—fishing is a fun and relaxing pastime that creates many childhood memories to treasure. And now that the 2017 fishing season has officially opened, it’s the perfect time to skate on over to one of these local fishing holes—perfect for pint-sized anglers.

photo: John Mitchell

Angle Lake
Apart from the occasional airliner passing overhead, Angle Lake is a great escape from the city. Here you will find a big fishing pier, sandy beach and grassy area as well as a playground to pass the time when the fish aren’t biting. You’ll also find quite a few regulars here who are always happy to share their fishing tips. Psst… during the summer months, silver trout called kokonee are plentiful, but you can also reel in largemouth bass, rock bass, yellow perch and, if you’re lucky, a rainbow trout.

Angle Lake
19408 International Blvd.
SeaTac, Wa 98188
206-296-0100
Online: kingcounty.gov or map it

photo: Helen Walker Green

Gold Creek Trout Farm
This hatchery can be loads of fishy fun, but you might find the fish are really easy to catch (sometimes they’re practically jumping on to your line). Kids serious about fishing will probably want more of a challenge, but it’s a great place for beginners to catch the fishing bug.

Good to know: Poles, bait, buckets and nets are supplied, so you can leave your gear at home and no catch-and-release is allowed which means must take your fish home. Fish are also cleaned and prepared for you on site, so you can cook and eat them when you get home. Gold Creek Trout Farm is a state certified food fish supplier, and their ponds are filled with spring water so the fish have a very fresh taste.

Gold Creek Trout Farm
15844 148th Ave. N.E.
Woodinville, Wa 98072
425-483-1415
Online: goldcreektroutfarm.com or map it

Hours: Vary. Check their website.
Cost: $7.50-$8 for a 11″-14″ fish; 15″-36″ fish are priced by length (chart posted by cleaning shed).

photo: Helen Walker Green

The Old Fishing Hole
A favorite of young fishers for generations, The Old Fishing Hole is just for fishermen and women ages 14 and younger. The best part? It’s stocked with 1,500 trout every year! So grab yourself a spot on the grassy shore, bait your hook and reel ’em in!

Good to know: There is an honor system here of six fish per child.

The Old Fishing Hole (south of W. Meeker St.)
Frager Rd.
Kent, Wa 98032
253-856-5200
Online: kentwa.gov or map it

Cost: Free

photo: Robin Graham

Elliott Bay Fishing Pier 
This public fishing pier is located in Magnolia’s Centennial Park. Here you will find covered cleaning stations on the pier and a little bait shop (that also sells espresso). And when you’re done fishing, enjoy everything the park has to offer including walks along the shore and a rose garden.

Elliott Bay Fishing Pier at Terminal 86
Centennial Park
2711 Alaskan Way
Seattle, Wa 98121
206-787-3000
Online: portseattle.org or map it

photo: Wray Family

Pine Lake Park
The young Eastside anglers’ not-so-secret spot, Pine Lake, is perfect for fishing with kids. Here you can reel in rainbow trout, largemouth bass, yellow perch and pumpkinseed sunfish from the fishing pier. Or bring your boat and try catching a big one out in the lake!

Good to knowFishing for an Experience offers kids’ angling trips on Pine Lake.

Pine Lake Park
2401 228th Ave. S.E.
Sammamish, Wa 98075
Online: sammamish.us/parks-recreation/parks-trails/pine-lake-park or map it

photo: Kristina Moy

Luther Burbank Park
If you’re looking for a spot not too far from downtown Seattle, head over to Mercer Island, where the fishing is fine! Drop your line into Lake Washington from the fishing pier at Luther Burbank Park and see if you can catch a black crappie, crawfish or longnose sucker—all while enjoying the amazing views.

Good to know: This park has a great play area and an off-leash dog park for your pooch, so bring along the whole fam.

Luther Burbank Park
2040 84th Ave. S.E.
Mercer Island, Wa 98040
425-295-0585
Online: mercergov.org or map it

photo: Joanne Wilson

Green Lake
For little anglers in North Seattle, Green Lake is stocked full of rainbow and brown trout just waiting to be caught. Kids can also catch catfish, carp and pumpkinseed sunfish. Drop your line from the grassy shore or the wooden fishing pier near the Small Craft Center and see what will nibble on your line. Of course, Green Lake also offers tons of other activities if the fish are not biting including a 3-mile paved trail, boat rentals, a play area, wading pool and lots of delish eateries.

Green Lake
5900 W. Green Lake Way N.
Seattle, Wa 98103
206-684-4075
Online: seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/green-lake-park or map it

photo: Helen Walker Green

Mill Pond
For families near Auburn, Mill Pond is a great little fishing hole for anglers 14 and under only. Grab your pole and fish from the fishing dock or the shore. Psst… the City of Auburn holds their annual Special Needs Youth Fishing Derby here. Get more deets here.

Mill Pond
4582 Mill Pond Dr. S.E.
Auburn, Wa 98092
253-931-3000
Online: auburnwa.gov/things_to_do/parks_trails/mill_pond.htm or map it

photo: Heidi Baughman

Gene Coulon Park
There’s so much to do at this Lake Washington park including fishing from the pier. C.A.S.T. for Kids holds a Fishing Kids derby here every June for ages 5-14. Little anglers get a free hands-on fishing lesson, water safety tips and more (register online). But don’t worry if you don’t catch any fish, you can always catch a tasty cod ‘n chips from Ivars, located right by the fishing pier.

Gene Coulon Memorial Beach Park
1201 Lake Washington Blvd. N.
Renton, Wa 98056
Online: rentonwa.gov/living/default.aspx?id=74 or map it

photo: Kristina Moy

Seacrest Park
Hop on the West Seattle Water Taxi to Seacrest Park and drop your line in Puget Sound. You’ll find a great fishing pier, sporting panoramic views of the Seattle skyline, as well as spiny dogfish and starry flounders. Afterwards, grab fish tacos (or a kimchi quesadilla) from  Marination Mai Kai located on the pier.

Good to know: The West Seattle Sportsmen’s Club holds their annual Kids’ Fishing Pond event in the parking area of the park (for kids 14 and under). The Club brings their own pond and stocks it with trout as well provides poles, bait and lots of help and fishing tips from Club members. Kids can catch one or two fish, depending on how many young anglers show up. (Psst… they want to make sure everyone gets a fish!)

Seacrest Park
1660 Harbor Ave. S.W.
Seattle, Wa 98126
206-684-4075
Online: seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/seacrest-park or map it

photo: Wray Family

Jim’s U Fish
The fish are jumping at Jim’s! Like other hatcheries, the fish here are pretty easy to catch, but it’s still lots of fun. This U-fish spot makes a great day out with the fam and not only can you catch some rainbow trout, you can also enjoy all that Old McDebbie’s Farm has to offer (from pony rides and a petting zoo to an awesome play area and carousel). Psst… pack your own lunch to enjoy at one of several picnic spots.

Good to know: No catch-and-release is allowed here. Fish are cleaned and bagged for free.

Old McDebbie’s Farm & Jim’s U Fish
4924 268th St. E.
Spanaway, Wa 98387
253-875-0356
Online: oldmcdebbiesfarm.net or map it

Cost: $6/general admission; $2/pole rental; $2/bait; $6/fish. General admission is good for all attractions at Old McDebbie’s Farm.

Hours:
Spring & Fall – Fri.-Sun., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Summer – Wed.-Sun., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

photo: Richard Green

Belvoir Place
A small fishing dock on the shores of Union Bay, Belvoir Place is not usually busy, so it’s perfect for beginners. Kids can fish for largemouth and smallmouth bass, yellow perch, black crappie and coastal cutthroat. Psst… this spot is one of Seattle’s best-kept secrets, probably because it’s quite hard to find (squeezed between two houses).

Belvoir Place
3659 42nd Ave. N. E.
Seattle, Wa 98105
Online: seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/belvoir-place or map it

photo: Kristina Moy

Seward Park
You’ll enjoy a lovely view from this fishing pier on Lake Washington, especially if the mountain is out. Après fishing, enjoy a stroll through Seward Park and a swing on the zipline.

Good to know: Don’t forget to bring an extra layer. This fishing spot can get a bit windy.

Reverend Murphy Fishing Pier at Seward Park
5900 Lake Washington Blvd. S.
Seattle, Wa 98118
206-684-4075
Online: seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/seward-park or map it

photo: Richard Green

Lincoln Park
Watch ferries crisscross the sound as you fish from the driftwood strewn beach at Lincoln Park. Popular with families, Lincoln Park boasts great salmon fishing during the summer months as well as plenty of other activities (think playgrounds, hiking trails, zip lines and even a saltwater pool). But be prepared. Lincoln Park can get quite busy, especially during the bi-annual “pink” salmon run.

Lincoln Park
8011 Fauntleroy Way S.W.
Seattle, Wa 98136
206-684-4075
Online: seattle.gov/parks/find/parks/lincoln-park or map it

photo: Wray Family

Redondo Pier
Many kids have memories of catching their first fish at Redondo Pier. There’s a bait shop at the top of the pier and complimentary children’s life jackets for use while fishing. Afterwards, take a stroll along the boardwalk and check out the Marine Center to learn more about our fishy friends.

Good to know: Salty’s has a pop-up seafood stall on the pier all summer long.

Redondo Pier
Redondo Beach Dr. & Redondo Way
Des Moines, Wa 98198
Online: desmoineswa.gov/Facilities/Facility/Details/15 or map it

photo: Kristina Moy

Note: Children 14 & under do not need a fishing license in the state of Washington. However, they do need to keep and fill out a catch record card if they are fishing for salmon, Pacific halibut, sturgeon, steelhead or Dungeness crab. You can register for one online or call the Fish Program Customer Service line at 360-902-2700 for more information. Crabbing requires a special endorsement, also available online. Psst… be sure to mark your calendars with these fun fishing events for kids all over Washington!

Did we miss your family’s favorite fishing hole? Tell us in the Comments below.

— Helen Walker Green