We’ve all been there, trying to muscle our way through revolving doors while pushing a stroller; cramming into elevators like sardines because we’re trying to fit everyone in, stroller and all. It’s no wonder we get excited when we see wide hallways, spacious elevators and accessible doors that open with the push of a button. Whether your little monkey is sleeping in the pram and you need to wander or you’ve got to keep big sibs entertained while baby’s still strapped in, we’ve found eight “wheelie” cool museums where you can do just that.

washington-state-history-museum-fb-pagephoto: Washington State History Museum Facebook page

Washington State History Museum
Whether you’re rocking a single or double stroller, you’ll have plenty of space to move through the exhibits at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. In the Great Hall, your cuties can learn about our state’s mining history, train travel and lumber mills, and get the low down on the how the original Hudson Bay Company came to be, all from the comfort of their cozy stroller seat. The elevator, just off the entryway, is plenty roomy, so you and your strollin’ friends can all take a ride together. Once you hit the fifth floor, you’ll find intriguing exhibits on Seattle’s early alt-music scene, history and time, and the 1,800 square-foot model railroad just waiting for your little conductor’s know how. Make history with your crew soon!

wa-state-history-museum-model-trains

photo: Washington State History Museum’s Facebook page

1911 Pacific Ave.
Tacoma, Wa 98402
253-272-9747
Online: washingtonhistory.org/visit/wshm
Cost: $12/Adults; $8/Kids (6-17); 5 & under Free

Pacific Science Center
The wide-open spaces and ramps throughout the Pacific Science Center make this downtown fave a can’t-miss when pushing a stroller is on your activity itinerary. All of the museum’s main exhibits are easily navigated by strollers of all shapes and sizes. And that means families can check out the motorized dinos, learn healthy habits at Professor Wellbody’s Academy or try to solve a mystery Sherlock Holmes style without any hassle. There’s even ample stroller parking if you want to unload your crew to build, climb or get a little wet in the toddler play area. But fair warning, if you plan to check out an IMAX movie while you’re there, it’s a no-strollers-allowed sitch, but that doesn’t mean you can’t go. It just means you’ve got to park it before you take your wee one in to experience the big screen.

experiment-at-psc-from-fbphoto: Pacific Science Center Facebook page 

200 Second Ave. N.
Seattle, Wa 98019
206-443-2001
Online: pacificsciencecenter.org
Cost: $19.95/Adults; $14.75/Youth (6-15); $11.75/Kids (3-5); under 3 Free

Seattle Art Museum
SAM is an easy place to take stroller bound kiddos when you need to get out of the house. There’s plenty of room to push them, sure, but the real bonus is that keeping them strapped in means you don’t need to worry about curious little hands reaching out to “explore” the masterpieces lining the walls. That’s what we call win-win. And if your mini me wants to get out, or big sib needs to sit and play awhile, strollers can easily be pulled off the main strip into one of the corner pocket play spots in the museum. Our favorite part? You can count on SAM to be pretty quiet, which makes it an ideal place for parents to move around while baby sleeps soundly in her buggy.

photo: Seattle Art Museum Facebook page

1300 First Ave.
Seattle, Wa 98101
206-654-3100
Online: seattleartmuseum.org
Cost: $19.95/Adults; 12 & under Free

LeMay America’s Car Museum
Just like drivers look for long stretches of highway to really open up that engine on, parents are keen to find long stretches of hallways to roll their strollers. And that’s what you’ll find inside the many exhibits at the LeMay America’s Car Museum in Tacoma. Whether you’re wheeling through Lucky’s Garage to see some of the museum founder’s coolest cars on display, or traveling back in time strolling through the Route 66 exhibit, those long stretches of stroller-way seem to go on for miles and miles.

route-66-pic-museum-of-cars-website

photo: LeMay America’s Car Museum website

2702 E. D St.
Tacoma, Wa 98421
253-779-8490
Online: americascarmuseum.org
Cost: $18/Adults, $10/Kids (6-12); 5 & under Free

Museum of Flight
Now boarding all stroller passengers taking off for the Museum of Flight! Roll on through all of the exhibits at this museum without batting an eye, because it’s so easy to do. Whether you’re scoping historic planes on display in the Great Gallery, marveling at the heroics of WWII fighter pilots, or bouncing from station to station in the Red Barn, there’s plenty to engage future pilots of all ages. Access many of the hottest spots for kiddos at the great glass elevator that’s easy to spot, and just as easy to ride, in the middle of the Great Gallery. Once you’re done there, take the bridge to the Aviation Pavilion, and elevator down to check out the historic planes they have on display. Word to the wise, if you’re planning on touring any of the planes on the tarmac, you’ll have to park your stroller first. Otherwise, you’re cleared for take off!

museum-of-flight-allison-sutcliffe

photo: Allison Sutcliffe

2904 E. Marginal Way
Seattle, Wa 98018
206-764-5720
Online: museumofflight.org
Cost: $21/Adults; $13/Youth (5-17); 4 & under Free

Museum of History and Industry
If you’re down in South Lake Union, MoHAI is a perfect spot to take your stroller bound buddy for some exploration time. The Great Hall is all about the open space, so it makes rolling through with a stroller simple and easy. And the large glass elevator is front and center so you don’t have to seek out out-of-the-way hallways that lead to hidden elevators. Most of the main exhibits are on the second floor, and once you reach it, you’ll find it’s easy to weave in and out each engaging room, even if you’re pushing a double wide. And our favorite part (we’re guessing it’ll be your kiddo’s too) is the Kid-struction Zone on the third floor. Your sidekick can get her build on here, test her acting chops on one of the stages or check out passing ships on Lake Union from the view windows. Plus, there’s plenty of room for your stroller there too!

mohai-museum-great-hall

photo: Allison Sutcliffe

860 Terry Ave. N.
Seattle, Wa 98109
206-324-1126
Online: mohai.org
Cost: $19.95/Adults; 14 & under Free

Olympic Sculpture Park
There’s nothing better than getting out in the fresh air on a dry spring day with the kidlets. And when you can look at gorgeous, ginormous art installations and sculptures while you’re at it, all the better. So when the sun is shining, load up the stroller and hit the Olympic Sculpture Park along the waterfront. The packed, windy trail is easy to navigate with any size stroller, and since streets aren’t involved, sibs can run ahead or lag behind without too much worry on your part. We also love the terraced yard where you can easily park a stroller and still have plenty of room to chase big brother or sister when they’ve got to let out some steam.

olympic-sculpture-park-dan-v-yelp

photo: Dan V. via Yelp

2901 Western Ave.
Seattle, Wa 98121
206-654-3100
Online: seattleartmuseum.org/visit/olympic-sculpture-park
Cost: Free

White River Valley History Museum
This boutique museum in Auburn is a quiet place to bring sleeping babies or even wide-awake ones who want to toddle and explore. Part of what makes it such a great option is its size. It’s all on one level, so you’re never crammed into an elevator with your crew. And it’s not too big, so you can easily keep an eye on big sibs or climbers who like to go from stroller to wandering and back again. The interactive kid-friendly elements that enhance each exhibit appeal to any age, and they also keep the littlest explorers in one place, for a while anyway. The place is small and cute, just like your sidekick!

wrvm-girl-in-cook-tent-copy

 photo: Allison Sutcliffe

918 H St.
Auburn, Wa 98002
253-288-7433
Online: wrvmuseum.org/visit_the_museum.html
Cost: $5/Adults; $2/Kids

What’s your favorite museum to hit when you’ve got your stroller in tow? Tell us in the Comments below.

— Allison Sutcliffe