In Partnership with Amazon Fire Kids Edition

Summer is coming and that means plenty of time at the beach or the park. If you’ve got a kid that loves to read—or a kid you want to encourage the habit in—there’s no reason to stay inside. The Amazon Fire HD 8 Kids Edition has an endless supply of titles you can download directly to the tablet, so you don’t need to be online (and the vibrant, high-resolution, polarized screen means reading outside is easy as pie). Plus, there’s a two-year, worry-free guarantee and a Kid-Proof case so you can feel fine about taking it with you on-the-go. We’ve culled through some of our favorite books for kids to get you started as you stock your Fire Kids Edition Tablets today. Scroll down for our must-reads.

Ages 3-5

Moon by Alison Oliver

Beautifully written and illustrated by Babylit books illustrator Alison Oliver, Moon is all about getting into the woods to find your inner (gentle) beast. Head into the fanatasitcal forest with Moon this summer and encourage kids to connect with their wild side. 

Download it here

photo: Amber Guetebier

Red, A Crayon's Story

"He was Red. But he wasn't very good at it." This beautifully illustrated book by Michael Hall reminds kids (and their grown-ups) that just because you are labeled something doesn't mean that's who you are. Red colors everything blue, and it takes a special friend to help him understand that being blue is a good thing. 

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Gokul Village & the Magic Fountain

When our editor’s son got his six-year-old hands on this book—written by Jeni Chapman and Bal Das and illustrated Charlene Chuahe was beyond delight. In fact, he read it at least four times in a row. We’re not sure if it was the beautiful illustrations or the message of the book that grabbed him, but this book is a celebration of friendship, diversity and the power of imagination, all centered around a village's fountain. Promotes cultural diversity and understanding, so it's an epic win, and kid-approved! 

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Love

This recent release from Last Stop on Market Street, Newbery Medal-winning author Matt de la Peña and bestselling illustrator Loren Long tells a lyrical story about love, the universal bond. How it binds us, how each person honors it in their own diverse way. From a mother’s adoration to the songs from a cab driver’s radio—love is around us every day, in different ways. A story that rises above and gives parents and kids comfort during modern times.

Get it here

Ages 6-8

Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls, 2: 100 More Stories of Extraordinary Women

Don’t let the title fool you: this recent sequel to the Goodnight Stories for Rebel Girls collection is appropriate for boys and girls, anytime, day or night. Beautifully illustrated, the book contains 100 outstanding women from Beyoncé to Nefertiti. We promise you'll learn something, too! And with 100 different women, the book will last you all summer long (unless you devour it, like we did, in one sitting). A great book to keep on hand for future essays!

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Malala's Magic Pencil

The story is based on Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai’s childhood wish to have a magic pencil that would “make everyone happy,” and could “erase the smell of garbage from her city.” This book explores every person’s power to change the world through strength of character and determination. 

Get your copy here

Annie’s career day at school prompts her family to guess all of the things Annie wants to be when she grows up—and her family puts their own hopes and dreams into her. She’ll tell the world her story like her reporter grandfather, soar high like her basketball star mom, bake brave like her grandma. But Annie’s dream of being an astronaut takes all those things and more. Bonus info about famous female astronauts and facts about the moon, make this the perfect book for any aspiring astro-lover of any age or gender. Written by Suzanne Slade, illustrated by Nicole Tadgell

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The Book with No Pictures

You may know him as Ryan from ˆThe Office, but your kids will never forget B.J. Novak for writing this hilarious book. As promised, there are no pictures—but don't let that defer you. A perfect book to read together, the book encourages kids to "trick" an adult into reading it out loud. You'll find yourself giggling right along with the kids when you declare that you "eat ants for breakfast, right off the rug!" and other nonsensical things. 

Click here to get it. 

Ages 9-12

The Bird, the Boy & the Coffin Maker

This brand-new chapter book will take your children to a world of magical realism alongside the sea. Alberto the widower and coffin maker, lives alone in the town of Allora, where fish fly from the glittering sea below. And then one day a little bird—followed by a little boy—arrive at Alberto’s doorstep and everyone’s lives change. With whimsical illustrations by Anuska Allepuz, this first book from author Matilda Woods reads a bit like an Isabel Allende novel for young readers. A beautiful reading experience for kids ages 8-12 (and their parents).

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George's Secret Key to the Universe

The late genius and physicist Stephen Hawking, along with his daughter Lucy, wrote a series of young adult science fiction books. The first book in their series, George's Secret Key to the Universe, introducers readers aged 8 to 12 to the world of a scientist named George, his daughter, and a supercomputer named Cosmos. The perfect mind-expanding summer read.

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Ugly

Robert Hoge was born with a tumor the size of a tennis ball in the middle of his face and short, twisted legs. But he survived. The tumor was successfully removed and a new nose was made from one of his toes. All of his life, strangers stared at him and both kids and adults called him names. Especially ugly. This poignant memoir tells the story of Robert and how he refused to let his face define him—how he discovered himself, his talents, and following his heart. Great inspirational read and a good reminder for your tweens and pre-tweens that beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Order it now.

The First Rule of Punk

What’s the first rule of punk? Be yourself. On the first day of a new school, twelve-year-old  Malú (María Luisa, if you want to annoy her) doesn’t exactly have a smooth day: she violates the school’s dress code with her punk rock look, and upsets Posada Middle Schools queen bee. But her dad reminds her, things get better if she just remembers what being punk really is. This awesome book by Celia C. Perez will encourage your own little rebels to be true to themselves.

Get it now.

What’s on your kid’s summer reading bucket list? Tell us in a comment below. 

—Amber Guetebier

The Top Summer Reading List for Kids