Last night Alicia Keys teamed up with Nickelodeon for Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special. Keys was joined by experts to help families navigate these important discussions. During the broadcast Keys spoke with Black kids about the bias they have faced in their lives.

The special featured the leaders of the Black Lives Matter movement answering questions from real kids, offering tools for families to have constructive conversations about race and inclusivity and highlighted teen activists who are fighting racial injustice. Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special is the first of a series of Nick News specials that will air on Nickelodeon in the coming months.

Keys said, “I’ve had a vision of a forum that can engage kids during this time and help to focus our attention on how they might be feeling, and this Nick News special is it!  Talking about race can be sensitive and uncomfortable; and sometimes we try to protect our children from racism they are already experiencing.  But honestly, there is no way around this topic if we want to move forward in any kind of meaningful way.  What’s happening in the world is not just a problem for the Black community, it’s all of our problem and we ALL have to care about it in order to change it!  This is such an important, vulnerable, honest and beautiful conversation, and I know many families may be searching for the right way to enter it.  Let’s really deep dive together.”

Kids, Race and Unity: A Nick News Special was broadcast across Nickelodeon, TeenNick, and Nicktoons, and is now available on Nickelodeon YouTube, Nick On Demand, the Nick App and the Nick Pluto TV channel following the premiere.

A discussion guide as well as anti-racism resources, made in partnership with The Conscious Kid and Dr. George James, will be available on nickhelps.com and Nickelodeon’s social channels following the premiere of the special.

—Jennifer Swartvagher

Featured photo courtesy of Nickelodeon

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