If you’re in major family planning mode, it might also be a good time for a career change. Career Expert site Zippia recently studied the best and worst jobs for expecting moms who are looking for paid maternity leave (because who isn’t?) and the results are pretty interesting.

Zippia scraped over one million job listings to determine which companies were likely to offer paid maternity leave by searching for specific keywords. Those jobs with the highest percentage of keywords offered the most maternity leave benefits. Here’s what they discovered.

photo: Matthew Henry via Burst

The following job titles had over 10 percent of listings that mentioned maternity leave:

1. Senior Reliability Engineer

2. Lead Engineer

3. Electronics Tehnician

4. Senior Recruiter

5. Technical Support Engineer

6. Technical Recruiter

7. Compliance Analyst

8. Sales Manager

9. Software Test Engineer

10. Enterprise Account Executive.

 

Notably, all of these job titles require tons of experience and don’t apply to the majority of job seekers who likely work in entry or mid-level careers.

Zippia also noted the worst job options when it comes to getting paid maternity leave, with less that 1 percent offering the benefit:

1. Cook

2. Server

3. Sales Engineer

4. Case Manager

5. Architect

6. Sales Specialist

7. Machine Operator

8. Systems Administrator

9. Administrative Assistant

10. Material Handler

 

Many of the worst job options for paid maternity leave pay less than $30,000 annually, adding to the already difficult challenges of how moms can afford to take time off for baby. Obviously not everyone can afford to make a huge career change, but knowing which jobs offer a paid leave definitely helps when it comes to planning––and waiting for the U.S. to finally get its act together on offering a national paid maternity leave program.

––Karly Wood

 

RELATED STORIES

And the Most Popular Baby Names of 2020 Were…

Survey Finds Pandemic Changed *This* Habit in Kids & It’s a Pleasant Surprise

Are Parents Good at Teaching Their Kids Financial Literacy? New Survey Has Answers