It may have seemed like an April Fool’s Day prank, but Burger King’s Impossible Whopper is a real thing and the vegetarian burger will soon be rolling out nationwide.

After testing the new Impossible Whopper at locations around the St. Louis, Missouri area Burger King has announced that it plans to expand the testing of the meatless burgers in more markets with the intent of offering the new vegetarian option at locations nationwide by the end of the year.

“The Impossible Whopper test in St. Louis went exceedingly well and as a result, there are plans to extend testing into additional markets in the very near future,” the company said. “Burger King restaurants in St. Louis are showing encouraging results and Impossible Whopper sales are complementing traditional Whopper purchases.”

Like the regular (meat-included) Whopper, the Impossible version will also come with lettuce, mayo, ketchup, pickles, onions and sliced tomatoes. But unlike the burger you’re used to, the new veg pick is made with plant-based patties from Impossible Foods that are created to mimic the look, feel and taste of real meat. Other burger chains, including White Castle and Fatburger, already offer a vegetarian option made with Impossible Meat.

Chris Finazzo, president of Burger King North America, told CNN Business that the Impossible Whopper will, “give somebody who wants to eat a burger every day, but doesn’t necessarily want to eat beef every day, permission to come into the restaurants more frequently.”

The new Burger King menu item means that the Impossible Burger will more than double its current reach. With the ramp-up, Impossible is currently hiring for a third shift and increasing hours at its Oakland, California plant so it can stay on top of the delicious demand.

—Erica Loop & Shahrzad Warkentin

Featured photo: Mali Maeder via Pexels

 

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