The world is a colorful place, but for kids who are color blind, much less so. Eyewear company EnChroma aims to make the world that much brighter for people with color blindness with their special glasses—and that’s what makes its —glasses for kids with color blindness—so incredibly important.

Also known as color deficiency, being color blind means someone can’t decipher different colors from each other and usually it’s between reds and greens (blues can be also hard to distinguish, depending on the type of color blindness). But when given the option to wear a pair of glasses that increase vibrancy and color discrimination, all that changes.

Don’t believe us? Well grab your box of tissues and sit back to watch Cayson see the world in full color for the very first time in the video below.

A hereditary condition, roughly 1 in 12 males and 1 in 200 females are color blind. Children who manage color blindness can have difficulty in school following notes on the board made in different colors, color-coded instructions and other color-specific activities.

Currently, glasses from EnChroma are the only glasses on the market that enhance colors without disrupting color accuracy. You can see from the video above just how life changing being able to see the full color spectrum––to the point of happy tears!

EnChroma has been making glasses for color blindness for years, and the new Twain style is perfect for smaller faces. Kids are more likely to wear the better-fitting glasses because they are comfortable and more effective.

While the glasses don’t come cheap—children’s pairs start at $269each—it’s a small price to pay to bring the gift of color to life for kids who need it. You can see plenty of more amazing videos of people seeing colors for the first time on the EnChroma Facebook page.

––Karly Wood

Photos: Courtesy of EnChroma

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