The recent epinephrine auto-injector price hikes left many parents wondering where to get generic EpiPens. Well, now the FDA finally has an answer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently announced the approval of the first generic EpiPen and EpiPen Jr. and here’s what you need to know.

An estimated 5 percent of children in the United States have a food allergy, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). Allergies to nuts, dairy and other foods (along with latex, medications, insect bites/stings, chemicals and environmental triggers) can result in a life-threatening condition known as anaphylaxis.

Obviously avoiding the allergen is the easiest way to prevent a reaction. But that’s not always possible. Treating allergic anaphylaxis immediately is absolutely essential. Synthetic adrenaline, a.k.a. epinephrine, can reverse the symptoms and stop anaphylaxis from progressing.

If you have a kiddo with allergies (or know someone who does), then you know that EpiPens are a part of life for anyone who may potentially go into anaphylaxis.

The recent approval of Teva Pharmaceuticals USA’s generic epinephrine auto-injector in both 0.3 mg and 0.15 mg strengths is about to make life a lot easier for anyone who has life-threatening allergic reactions. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. said in an press release, “This approval means patients living with severe allergies who require constant access to life-saving epinephrine should have a lower-cost option, as well as another approved product to help protect against potential drug shortages.”

So how can your child get one of these new generic EpiPens? Like the non-generic version, you’ll still need a doctor’s prescription. Currently, the pharmaceutical company has not said when the generic EpiPens will be available, nor how much they will cost—but it’s a huge win for parents all the same.

—Erica Loop

Featured Photo: Courtesy of Mylan

 

RELATED STORIES:

Do Baby Wipes Cause Food Allergies in Kids? New Study Has a Surprising Answer

Could Breastmilk Help Reduce the Risk of Food Allergies?

Parents Rejoice As An EpiPen Competitor Becomes Available at Much Lower Cost