Ghosts and ghouls aren’t the only thing you should be worried about on Halloween. Besides the concern over cavities and staying up a little too late on a school night, there are some other important safety precautions to keep in mind when preparing for Halloween.

Check out these important Halloween safety tips.

photo: iStock

Trick-or-Treating Safety Tips

Trick-or-treating is always the highlight of Halloween for kids but there are some simple steps you can take to stay safe. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and other experts suggest the following:

1. Walk on sidewalks and never cut across yards or driveways. Obey all traffic signals and stay in crosswalks when crossing the street.

2. Wear bright-colored costumes to make it easier for children to be seen at dusk or in the dark. Add reflective tape to costumes and treat bags to provide additional visibility.

3. Carry a cell phoneIf your kids are too young for a smartphone, consider Relay, a tracking device-meets phone you can clip anywhere

4. Ensure costumes are flame-resistant and fit properly. The child's vision should not be obstructed by masks, face paint or hats. Costumes that are too long may cause kids to trip and fall, so trim or hem them as necessary.

5. Wear sturdy, comfortable, slip-resistant shoes to avoid falls.

photo: Relay

6. Know where your kids are. If your kids are old enough to trick-or-treat on their own or if you want to take precautions in case you accidentally get separated, there is an easy way to keep tabs on your kids whereabouts. Have your kids carry Relay, a screen-free, first phone for kids 6 and up who are too young for a smartphone but old enough to have some freedom.

Kids can send you voice messages to your phone, plus there are important features like GPS Tracking with Geofencing—your phone is alerted when your kids arrive home (or leave) and also tracks their current location.

Relay also has SOS Emergency Alerts: Kids can't misdial (or prank call) 911, but they can send out an SOS to any pre-approved contacts that parents have added to their Relay account. There's even a Missed Messages feature that makes sure you never miss a message from your kiddo and fun features like a language translator, joke-of-the-day feature, a daily weather report and more. Plus, Relay just clips on any backpack (or trick-or-treat bucket) or can be worn around the arm, wrist or neck. As a bonus, Relay is 15% off at Target now through 11/23!

7. Trick-or-treaters should only approach houses that are well-lit. It's not just about the spookiness factor—it's about avoiding slips, falls or other injuries, especially when navigating around in a costume.

8. Ensure costumes are flame-resistant and fit properly. The child's vision should not be obstructed by masks, face paint or hats. Costumes that are too long may cause kids to trip and fall, so trim or hem them as necessary.

9. Carry flashlights to see and be seen. Do not point your flashlight above the chest level to avoid blocking the vision of other trick-or-treaters.

10. Be aware of neighborhood dogs when trick-or-treating and remember that pets can be a threat when you approach their homes.

Pumpkin Carving Safety Tips

According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, 16,706 patients were treated for Halloween-related injuries last year. Over 3,000 patients were treated for pumpkin carving accidents alone. To have a fun—but safe—Halloween experience, the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons has some advice.

"Pumpkin carving is a fun activity, but it can result in serious cuts on the hand and injuries to bones and tendons," said AAOS spokesperson and pediatric orthopaedic surgeon L. Reid Boyce Nichols, MD. "Consider having children decorate pre-carved pumpkins with stickers and paint to avoid using sharp objects. This will allow children to join in the fun while eliminating the use of sharp objects and their risk of injury,” Nichols continues.

To stay safe while decorating pumpkins the AAOS suggests these tips:

1. Use a pumpkin carving kit or knives specifically designed for carving. These are less likely to get stuck in thick pumpkin skin. Some Halloween carving devices, designed especially for older children, may be safe for use with parental supervision.

2. Carve pumpkins in a clean, dry and well-lit area. Also make sure there is no moisture on the carving tools or your hands.

3. If you do get cut, apply pressure with a clean cloth and elevate the injured area above the heart. If bleeding does not stop within 10-15 minutes or if the cut is deep, you may need to contact your doctor. Make sure cuts are cleaned and covered with clean bandages.

4. Avoid candles in Halloween pumpkins and other decorations. Instead, use non-flammable light sources, like glow sticks or artificial pumpkin lights.

—Shahrzad Warkentin & Amber Guetebier