Believe it or not, waterfalls do exist in Los Angeles. From quick and easy beginner treks to more adventurous trails, these family-friendly waterfall hikes in SoCal are almost out-of-this-world (or at least out of the dry, desert-like climate we’ve come to know and love). Pro Tip: To make your waterfall hike as enjoyable and memorable as possible,  go early to beat any crowds.

Escondido Falls: Malibu

This 150-foot, multi-tiered waterfall is the highest waterfall in the Santa Monica Mountains but that doesn't mean it's tough to get to. This is an easy, flat trail (it begins on the road so stay on the clearly marked path for safety) and allows hikers of all ages to enjoy dipping their toes in the cool, refreshing water. Expect to hop over some creek beds, maybe scuttle over a boulder or two and climb some low hanging branches during the journey—there's just enough along the trail to keep it interesting for the little ones for the 3.8-mile roundtrip journey. 

Parking: $12 to park at the lot on Winding Way East, just off Pacific Coast Hwy. Follow the clearly marked path to the trailhead (you'll need to walk along the road before heading into the wooded park).

Insider Tip: The parking lot is small and the trail is popular, so plan to get there early. Don't forget to bring water shoes for stomping around the water and creek beds. 

27200 Winding Way
Malibu
Online: mrca.ca.gov

Eaton Canyon Falls: Altadena

Located inside this 190-acre park, a 40-foot waterfall with a wading area beckons at the end of the easy 3-mile shady trail but there are loads of highlights along the way, including a nature center with interesting exhibits. 

Parking: Free but the lots fill up quickly.

Insider Tip: You need to go under the bridge to access the waterfall so make sure to bring water shoes so you (and the little ones) can enjoy the water. The biggest complaint about this hike is usually how crowded it can be but during COVID, reservations and a photo ID are required. No same-day reservations or walk-ins are allowed. 

1750 North Altadena Dr.
Pasadena
Online: ecnca.org

Solstice Canyon: Malibu

In the Santa Monica Mountains, off the Pacific Coast Hwy, Solstice Canyon offers stunning vistas, architectural relics, the “Darth Vader” House (you’ll know it when you see it), and oh yeah, a 30-foot waterfall. If you’re feeling ambitious and brought plenty of sunscreen, we recommend heading up the small staircase near the park entrance to the Rising Sun Trail which meanders along the mountain crest with spectacular views of the vast blue ocean below. This trail then connects with the shady and mostly paved Solstice Canyon trail for a 3.2-mile loop.

From the Rising Sun Trail, you can descend down a steep-ish hill to Tropical Terrace, a once famously hip Malibu mansion that burned down in a fire in 1982, leaving, well, actual ruins in a very Malibu style. No, you won’t find Mayan stone calendars predicting the end of the world, but the less ancient Tropical Terrace is pretty cool. From there, follow the narrow rock step to a small waterfall just north of the mansion.

Parking: The free parking here fills up FAST (read: by 9:30 a.m.) but you can drive about 1/4 mile up Corral Canyon Rd. to a dirt turnout where parking is permitted.

Insider Tip: The Solstice Canyon trail is also a great out-n-back option for toddling hikers and babies on wheels, making it the only stroller-friendly waterfall hike we’ve met.

3455 Solstice Canyon Rd.
Malibu
Online: nps.gov/solsticecanyon

Monrovia Canyon Park Waterfall Trail: Monrovia

UPDATE: Due to the Bobcat Fire, this park is closed indefinitely. Please refer to the website for the most up-to-date information. 

Tucked away in the San Gabriel Mountains, just ten minutes off the 210 Freeway, Monrovia Canyon Park has 80 acres worth of nature to explore and is one of the least known (translation: least crowded) of our local cascade destinations. There are three options for hikers: The shortest route to the 30-foot falls is via the Nature Center (just .75 miles from the waterfall) with ample parking. If you think your kids can handle a longer hike (but not the longest) stop at the middle lot for a one-mile trek. And if you really want to experience the full monty (and know your kids can handle it) park at The Bill Cull trailhead at the park entrance that will take you along a shady 1.7-mile path to the falls.

A total fairyland canopy of oak trees, big leaf maple, and sycamores make this a good hike for any time of day. Best of all, your little nymphs and monkeys will have so much fun swinging from the low-hanging branches that wind along the trail they’ll forget they’re on an h-i-k-e.  (Shhh: we won’t tell if you don’t.)

Insider Tip: The park is open from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. with a $5 entry fee on weekdays, $6 on weekends and holidays. There are a few minor stream crossings and narrow passes making strollers cumbersome.

1200 N Canyon Blvd.
Monrovia
Online: cityofmonrovia.org

Sturtevant Falls: Arcadia

UPDATE: Due to the Bobcat Fire, this trail is closed indefinitely. Please refer to the website for the most up-to-date information.

Ranked as the most challenging of our cascade escapades at 3.3 miles, the out-n-back Sturtevant Falls trail in the San Gabriel Mountains is still family-friendly with a mostly flat and shady trail. Along the way, you'll pass a string of quaint cabins built in the 1900s, some that are available to rent. (Visit the website for more information). There are three modest water crossings, perfect for rock-hoppers of all ages.

This stunning 50-foot waterfall plunges into a shallow pool that the kiddos can actually wade around in...if they can stand the freezing temperature.

Parking: Thanks to the area's popularity, it's a bit of a bear no matter what time you arrive. Stop in the parking lot anyway to pick up the $5 adventure pass at the pack station—it’s required to park anywhere—and head back down Santa Anita Canyon Rd. to find a spot.

Insider Tip: The trail starts at Chantry Flats and descends down a .6 mile paved road that you'll have to trudge back up on the way out. Also, strollers won't be happy crossing streams, but we've seen plenty of baby carriers, backpacks, and slings ambling through these parts.

Chantry Flats Rd. & Angeles National Forest
Arcadia
Online: angelesnationalforest.gov

–Jennifer Wolfe & Andie Huber

featured photo: Melissa Smith via flickr

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