During the week at work, you have tons of ideas about improving the rate of return on various brands, streamlining the operational system and changing the strategic direction of your company. But when it comes to planning your weekend activities with your family, you have as many ideas as an intern on the first day of the job, which is to say none, apologies to all interns. The thing is, the family that plays together stays together and spending time together as a family is just as important as one-on-one time with the hubby, so we put together a list of go-to activities for family dates you’ll all love.

Go for a Walk
Take a walking tour of the city and discover some new and exciting facts, like how the phrase “ladies of the hook” was shortened to become a single word commonly linked to politicians. Think your kids wouldn’t want to traipse around the city? Throw some food into the mix. Food Tours are a great way to see the city and try new and interesting foods. Sidewalks of NY offers a Lower Eastside Eats tour that is full of New York and Jewish history, as well as giant pickles, huge pastrami sandwiches and some of the juiciest dumplings you’ve ever tasted. Both big kids and little kids are welcome on the tour.


Take In Some Culture
We probably don’t have to tell you that New York has some of the best museums in the world, just like we probably don’t have to tell you that most kids find museums boring. We’re not talking about the hands-on kids or science museums here. We’re talking about the stroll and look at art and sculptures type of museum where you can bet you’ll hear a “What’s that supposed to be, honey?” by the end of the day. Museums that have stepped up to the plate to make attending more fun for kids are the Guggenheim and MOMA. Both museums have tours of their exhibits for the underage crowd as well as workshops where they can create their own art. The Guggenheim even has a family activity pack filled with assorted goodies for kids, as well as a museum scavenger hunt. Doesn’t that sound like more fun than a barrel full of monkeys doing tricks?

Guggenheim
1071 Fifth Avenue
New York, Ny
212-423-3587
Online: guggenheim.org

MOMA
11 West 53 Street
New York, Ny
212-708-9400
Online: moma.org


Go On a Hunt for Stuff
No, we don’t mean just randomly walk the street and play I Spy with your kids, although that could be fun as well. We mean you should participate in a scavenger hunt. You can go the more organized route and sign up for a scavenger hunt organized by a company, like Watson Adventures. You’ll show up at a specific time, date and location, such as the American Museum of Natural History or Grand Central Station, and compete against other families. Remember to tell your kids (and yourself!) that it’s the experience, not winning that counts. Yeah, we had a hard time keeping a straight face, too. If organized activities are not for you, then check out Stray Boots which will send scavenger hunt clues directly to your phone. Pick the hunt that interests you, pay your fee and you’re off and running; no upfront scheduling necessary. You could also break your family up into two teams and compete against each other.


Get Your Groove On
Remember the good old days when you and your then boyfriend, now husband, used to hit the clubs and get down with your bad selves? Then you had kids, and now the only getting down you do is getting down on the floor to play or pick up toys. Well now you can get your party on family style. Every month at Le Poisson Rouge, Baby Loves Disco puts on a dance party for the whole family. There is a DJ and a MC to get the crowd hyped up. They’ll play some oldies, some goodies and some newer music. Bubbles, scarves and dance contests are just some of the fun things they have in store for kids. Tickets are $20 per walking human, as they call it, or $60 for a family of four.

Le Poisson Rouge
158 Bleecker St.
New York, Ny
212-505-3474
Online: babylovesdisco.com

What are your date-night recipes for success?

— Mikaela Walker

Photo 1 courtesy of Sidewalks of NY and Photo 2 courtesy of Téa Bernard