Kids are naturally curious and ask a lot of questions, but TBH we parents don’t always have the answers, especially when it comes to bigger questions. What is depression? What does “Black Lives Matter” mean? What is homelessness? Scholastic, your go-to publisher for kids books and book fairs, just turned 100 and to celebrate, they’ve debuted a virtual, topical bookshelf on Instagram aimed at helping parents and teachers answer those bigger questions: @scholasticbookshelf. Read on to check out their mission and see what it’s all about.

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Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. Swipe to see why civil rights must be protected. #ReadOn #Scholastic100 . Our featured story is from: “Forcing Forsythia” in Martin Rising: Requiem for a King by Andrea Davis Pinkney and Brian Pinkney [ages 9-12] . More stories 📚 that dive into the importance of #CivilRights here👇🏾 1️⃣ “Blue & Black” in The New York Times Upfront [ages 13+] 2️⃣ Child of the Dream [ages 9-12] 3️⃣ The Case for Loving: The Fight for Interracial Marriage [ages 6-8] 4️⃣ “Kids Fought for Change” in Scholastic News [ages 6-8] ⭐️ Explore related topics: Discrimination, Free Speech Find these stories & more at the link in bio. . © 2020 Scholastic Inc. All Rights Reserved.

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Why do some kids have have two dads? What does ‘Black Lives Matter’ mean? What is depression? According to Scholastic, 61% of parents and teachers already using stories to broach tricky conversations with kids. And with 3 out of 4 millenial parents using social media to seek parenting advice, the Scholastic Bookshelf merges their 100 years of storytelling expertise with a platform that allows parents and educators access to 60+ scholastic stories to discuss topics including race, empathy, illness, abuse, depression, anxiety and more.

Scholastic also addresses issues that are “bigger questions” to help expand educators and parents’ horizons or help them spark conversation, on topics including imagination, making friends, pets and more. Each post on the shelf includes several images with quotes and inspiration, as well as a list of what books these concepts can be found in. You can also shop the bookshelf directly to grow your home or school (or public) library.

Follow @scholasticbookshelfon Instagram to explore; then, find a topic to connect with a Scholastic book or classroom magazine excerpt. Next, swipe to explore questions, prompts and thought-starters, and #ReadOn to discover related stories on our shelves for kids of all ages.

 

—Amber Guetebier

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