Say hello to your new bedtime story (and a new bed time). The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep, a self-published book by Swedish author Carl-John Forssen Ehrlin, promises to make your kiddos drift off into their dream worlds faster than you can say “bedtime.” All you have to do is follow the book’s cues, such as yawning and speaking slowly, and turn your voice into a verbal rocking chair. Read on to discover the psychology behind this magical book.

bedtime-book

With a background in behavioral psychology and linguistics, Carl-John Forssen Ehrlin got the idea to use psychological and positive reinforcement to help kids sleep. Unlike most storybooks that may keep little ones awake and curious about the ending, The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep employs a specific language pattern that lulls listeners into relaxation. Kids are encouraged to listen instead of read and become a part of the journey with Roger the Rabbit. Even the friends he meets, like Sleepy Snail, Uncle Yawn and the Heavy-Eyed Owl, will make your baby think only of sleep.

At twenty-six pages long, The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep is longer than your average bedtime story, but the upside is that your kiddo will be entering that REM cycle before he or she can ask for a second read.

Have you read The Rabbit Who Wants to Fall Asleep to your buddy? Let us know in the Comments below!

— Christal Yuen