Your baby’s little piggies are the cutest things in the world. Preserve the memory of their pint-sized adorableness with a footprint craft. We created our own take on this timeless craft, and it’s as easy as they come (all you need is an hour or less depending upon how cooperative your bambino is that day). With just a little paper, paint and a willing candidate, you’ll get an amazing keepsake and colorful new piece of art for the nursery.

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With baby’s footprints, you’ll make a heart shape; that shape will be the “v” in the word “love.” In our rendition, the overall message recalls a familiar Beatles lyric, “All you need is love.” Fitting, because it’s exactly how moms feel about their new bundle of joy.

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Supplies needed:

Sketchpad or paper
Non-toxic water based acrylic or tempera paint in a few colors
Cotton balls
Wet wipes
Frame to fit finished picture
Fat-tipped indelible marker in the color of your choice

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Directions:

1. Get baby nice and calm. (A feeding just before you start the craft should do the trick.)

2. Choose your paint color. We went with bright, lovey-dovey red.

3. Apply paint to baby’s foot with a cotton ball. If you get too much paint on the foot, you can dab it off with a paper towel.

4. With the help of another person, hold your baby over the paper while planting his or her foot firmly on the paper to make the perfect footprint.

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5. Wipe off paint immediately with wet wipe. Even though it’s non-toxic, you don’t want any near your little one’s face.

6. Repeat the process with the second foot to form the “V” shape.

7. Here’s where you can get creative: Choose any song lyric with the word “love.” Use a fat-tipped black marker, a charcoal pencil or an oil-based pastel to create the lettering.

8. Once the paint and ink have dried, place your picture in a frame and hang it in a special place.

9. Allow your heart to melt every time you lay eyes on it!

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Have you ever made a footprint keepsake? Let us know about it in the Comments section below.

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— Christina Fielder