Do you think that curious kids are more likely to become successful adults? Well, as it turns out, plenty of parents do. Recent research, conducted by the smarties behind the Baby Einstein brand along with Wakefield Research, reveals what parents actually think when it comes to their littles’ sense of curiosity. Read on to find out the results that might describe you — or not.

So what do parents think about their kiddos’ curiosity? To start with, a whopping 94% of parents think that children who are more curious are more likely to be successful adults someday. Hmm. Maybe that’s why we’re all trying to let our tots explore, explore and explore some more.

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Along with believing that curious children grow into adult successes, the research found that 97% of parents agree that those curious kids excel over those that just don’t show the same sense of curiosity. The data breaks down into three main areas of curiosity: Being creative, learning faster/more easily and critical thinking. According to this study, 76% of parents believe curious children excel when it comes to creativity, 75% think they learn faster and 68% agree they do better at thinking critically.

But parents don’t just believe that curiosity makes their kids more successful. Almost all of the parents surveyed, 97% of them, feel more confident in their mommy-ing or daddy-ing skills when watching their kiddos explore.

According to Meryl Macune, Senior Vice President of Kids II (the company that owns/operates Baby Einstein), “Curiosity isn’t just an enabler to a child’s development and future success.” Macune goes on to say, “it also helps parents feel reassured that they’re doing a great job.” And really, what parent doesn’t want to feel like their doing a great job?

What do you do to help your child explore, experiment and make their own discoveries? Share your tips with us in the comments below.

—Erica Loop

 

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